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JSF / Oracle Articles by Andrei Cioroianu

Building Database-driven Applications with JSF
This article explains how to build JSF forms, validate the form data with JSF, implement JSF actions that access the database, and present the SQL result sets with JSF. A relational database can be updated and queried using a low-level API (JDBC), an object-relational (O-R) mapping framework such as Oracle TopLink, or a JSP tag library (e.g. JSTL). These options are discussed throughout this article along with the main JSF features.

Using ADF Faces in Existing JSF Applications
The article shows how to modify JSF pages in an existing application to use Oracle ADF Faces, and explains the benefits of this UI framework. You'll find out how to add ADF Faces to existing JSF projects, and how to enhance your Web applications by using the rich UI components provided by ADF Faces. You'll also see how Oracle JDeveloper can make your work much easier.

Reusability in Web Applications
This article offers some best practices for reusing UI parts in Web applications that are based on JSF and ADF Faces. You will learn how to create templates that define the layout of the Web pages and how to reuse forms, menus, and button bars. You'll also find out how to transform existing JSP pages in order to make them easier to maintain and how to use the components provided by JSF and Oracle ADF Faces together with JSTL and modern JSP features such as tag files.

Oracle Workshop's Support for Java EE 5 Web Standards
The article explores some of the new Java EE 5 features and walks you though the building of a simple Web application with Oracle Workshop (formerly BEA Workshop). You'll learn how to setup a Web project, build JSF-based forms, define page-navigation rules, create session EJBs with annotations, use dependency injection in JSF-managed beans, package the application in an EAR file, and deploy it to a local or remote Oracle WebLogic server.

Upload Files with JSF and MyFaces
The first half of the article explains how file uploading works, walking you through the source code of MyFaces and Commons File Upload (the former uses the latter internally). It is helpful to know what happens inside of these open source frameworks in order to use them efficiently, and to be able to modify them if you have to. In the second half of the article, you'll find a sample application that lets users upload files using their web browsers.

Using JSF
This article contains a web application made of four main components. A JavaBean class acts as a data model, holding some text and its attributes: font, size, color, alignment, etc. A JSF-based form allows users to provide values for the properties of the JavaBean. Another Java class generates an HTML paragraph with the given text and attributes. Finally, a JSP page shows the generated paragraph.


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